Thursday, August 30, 2007

Bush to hit Congress up for another $50 billion

By Scott Cavanagh
With the price tag for the Iraq War fast approaching $500 billion, the Bush Administration plans to request an additional $50 billion from Congress next month, following Gen. David Petraeus and U.S. Ambassador Ryan Crocker's state of the war reports.

Despite continued assertions that the President would make no decisions regarding future war strategy before hearing from both men, the White House appears to have reached its own conclusions concerning the success of this year's "troop surge" -- it's working and we're staying.

This should come as no surprise to anyone following the most recent developments surrounding the appearance of W's new favorite General in front of his least favorite legislative body. Between last week's announcement that most of Petraeus' findings would be documented in a report pieced together by White House spin doctors, to the Pentagon's calls for many of the meetings to be closed to the public, it is clear that Mr. Bush and his advisers plan to paint a fairly rosy scenario for the American people concerning progress in Iraq.

That conclusion flies in the face of the soon-to-be-released report by the Government Accountability Office (GAO), which found the Iraq War effort failing in 15 of the 18 congressionally mandated "benchmark" goals for military and political progress.

END OF POST

2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Sorry Scott,
Did you liberals think Petraeus was a writer or something? He's a soldier. He was never going to personally write an encyclopedia-sized document by himself while conducting a war campaign. Get real -- you have no idea what will be said, or come of these hearings.

Pete in Florida

Mike Hart said...

GAO Report basically says that Iraq is a mess but Bush and co. will not buy it and neither will the disgusting Pentagon, which is helping Bush to stay there by coming up with added info (obviously to help Bush's overly positive view) to add to report. Yeah, the Pentagon really loves its soldiers; they just see the troop as pawns and do not care how long they are in Iraq or how many die needlessly - as long as it gives them something to do and power/money, etc.