Wednesday, November 21, 2007

Bark Back Sports: More on Bonds and 'roids

He (Bonds) happened to have the bad luck of being associated with BALCO, which was run by a very imprudent guy who was reckless and got caught. Every other person you mention got their drugs from...we have no idea. That's the difference. And who's supposedly being hypocritical? Bonds has been indicted by a grand jury, and will be prosecuted by the feds. Major League baseball hasn't condemned him, and won't unless he's actually convicted. I think that's ridiculous, but at least it's consistent.


If Maguire or Sosa or Palmeiro could be linked to a supplier, you can bet the feds would be after him. And you can bet that MLB would be gutless idiots with them too, and not condemn players for cheating unless they were convicted in a court of law.

The real study in hypocrisy is how they handled Pete Rose. Don't get me wrong, I don't disagree with banning Pete...but why did they only go after Pete? What Bonds did was much worse than what Pete did.
John T. in Columbus

END OF POST

2 comments:

John T. in Columbus said...

He (Bonds) happened to have the bad luck of being associated with BALCO, which was run by a very imprudent guy who was reckless and got caught. Every other person you mention got their drugs from...we have no idea. That's the difference. And who's supposedly being hypocritical? Bonds has been indicted by a grand jury, and will be prosecuted by the feds. Major League baseball hasn't condemned him, and won't unless he's actually convicted. I think that's ridiculous, but at least it's consistent.
If Maguire or Sosa or Palmeiro could be linked to a supplier, you can bet the feds would be after him. And you can bet the MLB would be the gutless idiots with them too, and not condemn players for cheating unless they were convicted in a court of law.
The real study in hypocrisy is how they handled Pete Rose. Don't get me wrong, I don't disagree with banning Pete...but why did they only go after Pete? What Bonds did was much worse than what Pete did.

Scott Cavanagh said...

Sheffield was a BALCO guy, and he even admitted to using the Clear, much in the way Bonds did (with the flaxseed oil bit). Both Byrd and Ankiel were caught through records of deliveries from suppliers and baseball is simply saying "we didn't have a policy against it then". Are the feds planning to chase down those suppliers? Making Bonds the fall guy for BALCO is like giving the drug addict a life sentence and giving the dealer probation.

Yes, the key is that Bonds (like Sheffield) lied to a grand jury. But lying to Congress is also a felony (see Alberto Gonzalez) and no one seems to be pursuing charges against Palmeiro (although the main charges should be against McGwire for wearing those little lawyer glasses and Schilling for -- being Curt Schilling).

Is what Bonds did really worse than what Pete did? I think so, but you can certainly make a case that having a major league manager betting on games and being in debt hundreds of thousands of dollars to gamblers is worse than a player taking performance enhancers. Hell, Gaylord Perry openly cheated for 25 years and he's in the Hall.

The hypocrisy lies in the fact that MLB has feigned concern about this subject only since the publication of Canseco's book, but every baseball fan without his head up his ass knew these guys had been juicing for years. I had friends calling Sosa "Sammy Steroid" before he even had the chase with McGwire. Canseco was being serenaded with steroid catcalls in '88. MLB had no problem raking in the cash that Bonds' HR chase generated last season, yet they did nothing. What year did they actually institute the steroid policy, like three years ago?

Bonds, like Pete (without the hustle, charm or championships) is being made an example of, and that's okay by me. But the level of punishment they are seeking is over the top. Obstruction of Justice? How? They did not need Bonds to nail BALCO -- that case was open and shut, due, as you mentioned, to Conte's recklessness and ego. Thank God the president will step in and commute his sentence.